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dc.contributor.authorBleske-Rechek, April L.
dc.contributor.authorMaly, Jenna
dc.contributor.authorGunseor, Michaela
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-04T16:59:28Z
dc.date.available2017-12-04T16:59:28Z
dc.date.issued2017-12-04T16:59:28Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/77443
dc.descriptionColor poster with text, tables, and charts.en
dc.description.abstractPeople are biased toward seeing associations between independent events and assuming causal explanations for those associations. Indeed, the lay public incorrectly infers cause-and-effect from descriptions of non-experimental research as often as they correctly infer cause-and-effect from descriptions of experimental research. We suspect that these warning calls to educational and counseling psychologists are indicative of the state of research in the social sciences more generally, and we hypothesize that unjustified causal language occurs in empirical, peer-reviewed journal articles in psychology.en
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversity of Wisconsin--Eau Claire Office of Research and Sponsored Programs.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesUSGZE AS589;
dc.subjectMindware gapen
dc.subjectCausationen
dc.subjectCorrelationen
dc.subjectPsychologyen
dc.subjectPostersen
dc.titleDo Researchers Practice What They Preach? Unjustified Causal Language in Psychological Scientists' Descriptions of Their Worken
dc.typePresentationen


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