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dc.contributor.advisorFoster, Carl
dc.contributor.authorFalck, Katelyn M.
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-27T13:55:02Z
dc.date.available2017-09-27T13:55:02Z
dc.date.issued2016-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/76874
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to dertermine if sedentary individuals, categorized by American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) guidelines, would have a training effect from the use of the talk test or heart rate reserve to monitor exercise intensity. This study tested 54 previously inactive, young adults who, regardless of group, completed three components. Subjects were randomized into either the Talk Test (TT) group of the Heart Rate Reserve (HRR) group. First, a pre maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) test were completed. Second, over the course of 10 weeks, each consisting of a five minute warm up, 30 minute training, and five minute cool down. Workload, RPE, and heart rate (HR) were recorded within the 30 minute training session for both groups.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subjectKinesiologyen
dc.subjectExercise--Physiological aspectsen
dc.subjectHeart function testsen
dc.titleTalk test vs. heart rate reserve: is there a similar training effect?en
dc.typeThesisen


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